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UK leader says she’s prepared to allow a vote on fox hunting

“As it happens, personally, I’ve always been in favour of fox hunting and we maintain our commitment – we had a commitment previously – as a Conservative Party to allow a free vote and that would allow Parliament to take a decision on this”, she said.

“The animal rights movement has never even attempted to show that there has been any positive benefit for foxes and other wild mammals as a result of the Act”. Foxes are “accidentally” killed by dogs during some hunts.

“Polls indicate that 84 per cent of the public are opposed to a change in the law on hunting with hounds”.

@Stephenkb ACTUALLY, she’s offering a free vote on whether people whose dogs kill a fox should have to pretend it was a bad accident.

But certain modified forms of hunting foxes with hounds are still within the law, and “shooting foxes as vermin” also remains lawful, making the act hard to enforce. He told the Press Association: “I can not see many Conservative votes for fox hunting in marginal seats we are hoping to win”.

“Other blood sports such as dog fighting and cockfighting have been consigned to history and nobody is pushing for those to be legalised”.

However, in reality it is a series of rules regarding the hunting of wild mammals in England and Wales.

Fox-hunting fans say the activity is an important and traditional part of rural culture.

It comes as the Scottish Government is planning on strengthening the same legislation in Scotland while campaigners say Scots MPs could block any move in the United Kingdom parliament to reintroduce it. Very few hunts have been convicted under the Act but the impact on hunt staff is unpleasant and in some cases intolerable. Blue Fox (or Conservatives against Fox Hunting to use its alternative title) has the support of Tracey Crouch, Caroline Dinenage, Sir Roger Gale MP, Sir David Amess and Dominic Raab – all who were Conservative MPs in the last Parliament seeking re-election.

“He might find the 50 Conservative members who are elected, or majority, are anti-hunting”.

Adding: “A majority of 50 or more would give us a real opportunity for repeal of the Hunting Act”.

Sir Roger said he believed a “huge amount of parliamentary time and effort” has been spent on the issue, with the existing law “probably as good as we can get” given the difficulty in satisfying everyone.

Councillor Joy Squires, Labour’s parliamentary candidate in Worcester, said: “With all the challenges facing British people today, how can Theresa May suggest that a minority group with a minority interest, strongly linked to wealth and privilege should occupy precious parliamentary time?”

Upon hearing the Prime Minister’s staunch stance on the issue, May took to his social media channels to register his disgust with the politician’s latest views.

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